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Science Communication Material

NASA's Earth Observing System provides a variety of materials available for download. Feel free to choose a category below:

Seadler - GRIP Results Slide
File Draft GRIP feature slide_SBedits_ASedits.pptx

The Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) campaign studied the physical and environmental processes that affect the lifecycle of Atlantic hurricanes from formation to dissipation.

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Seadler - SABOR Results One-Pager
PDF icon SABOR one-pager 6.22.17.pdf

NASA’s Ship-Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR) experiment used cutting-edge technology in the air and the sea to verify and measure the amount, type, and distribution of phytoplankton in different ocean environments. The field campaign sought to answer whether new technologies, such as lidar and polarization, could be used to better observe changes in oceanic ecosystems. From 17 July to 17 August 2014, the SABOR campaign took in situ, ship-based above-water, and airborne measurements of phytoplankton content, particulate matter, and oceanic optical properties. The campaign sought to cover a broad range of oceanic environments—from optically complex coastal waters to clear blue open ocean—for maximum accuracy.

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Seadler - SABOR Results Slide
File SABOR Feature Slide 6.22.17.pptx

The Ship-Aircraft Bio-Optical Research (SABOR) experiment used cutting edge technology in the air and the sea to verify and measure the amount and distribution of phytoplankton in different ocean environments.

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Seadler - SEAC4RS Results One-Pager
PDF icon SEAC4RS onepager 4.3.17 - clean.pdf

NASA’S Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) campaign studied how aerosols are injected into and influence upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric composition and chemistry. The campaign sought to answer: − How does deep convection distribute aerosol particles and gases, including pollutants, in the atmosphere? − How do gases and aerosols influence atmospheric chemistry and climate? During multiple regional flights across the southeastern and southwestern United States, NASA incorporated measurements from satellites, research aircraft, weather balloons, and ground sites to measure atmospheric convection, composition, and chemistry. In particular, SEAC4RS examined the role of pollution, large urban centers, agricultural fires, and areas of intense isoprene emissions in the southeastern United States, as well as wildfires and the North American monsoon in the southwestern United States.

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Seadler - SEAC4RS Results Slide
File SEAC4RS feature slide 4.3.17.pptx

The Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) campaign studied how aerosols are injected into and influence upper tropospheric (UT) and lower stratospheric (LS) composition and chemistry.

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2016 NASA Booth Program for AGU
PDF icon NASA_AGU 2016 Events Program.pdf

NASA Science has a story to tell and, at AGU, you can be part of it. This year at our exhibit we will be telling stories about our Earth science, planetary science, and heliophysics endeavors via dynamic Hyperwall presentations, flash talks, and hands-on demos. In addition, the booth will also feature a variety of individual stations where you can talk face-to-face with NASA subject-matter experts. We hope you join us!

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2016 NASA Science Mission Directorate Calendar
PDF icon 2016 Calendar Color 508.pdf

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An EPIC View of Earth and the Far Side of the Moon
PDF icon DSCOVR_Lenticular_8_508.pdf

On July 16, 2015, a NASA camera onboard the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite returned a series of images of the entire sunlit side of Earth and the moon from its orbit at the first Lagrange point (L1)—a neutral gravity point between Earth and the sun, which is about 1 million miles (1.5 million kilometers) from Earth. These images from the series, taken by the Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) between 3:50 PM and 8:45 PM EDT, show the fully illuminated far side of the moon moving over the Pacific Ocean near North America. Also referred to as the “dark side,” this side of the moon is not visible from Earth. The far side lacks the large, dark, basaltic plains, or maria, that are so prominent on the Earth-facing side. The largest far side maria is the Mare Moscoviense [~170 miles (245 kilometers) in diameter] in the upper left quadrant. As the DSCOVR spacecraft slowly orbits around L1 (always viewing the sunlit side of Earth), the area of reflected sunlight near the center of the globe remains stationary, while the moon crosses the face of the Earth’s surface and Earth appears to rotate from left (west) to right (east). The North Pole is in the upper left quadrant of the globe. The primary objective of DSCOVR—a partnership between NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the U.S. Air Force—is to maintain the nation’s real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities, which are critical to the accuracy and lead time of space weather alerts and forecasts from NOAA.

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Astrophysics
PDF icon Astrophysics Brochure_508.pdf

Discover how the universe works, explore how it began and evolved, and search for life on planets around other stars.

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COP-22 Hyperwall Content
PDF icon NASA_COP22_Hyperwall Brochure 2016.pdf

This brochure provides information about the content displayed on NASA's Hyperwall in the U.S. Center at the twenty-second session of the Conference of the Parties (COP-20) held November 7-18, 2016, in Marrakech, Morocco.

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